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All In Threes: Writing Updates!

I don’t usually do these types of posts because I fear that they are too self-indulgent but I haven’t posted a writing update in ages so I don’t feel too irked putting this up. The older I get, the better I feel about both rejections and acceptances for publication. I remember being fretful and dreading clicking the “Submit” button because back then everything felt like a critique not just of the work but of myself but those are things you learn from and it’s become something I’ve found I can love. I remember a beautiful rejection letter by The Atlas Review from last year that I still keep in my Inbox as if to say get your work out there, it’s worth it. (And it usually is, whatever the outcome.) That said, it does feel extra good for work to be accepted–as though I’ve found a place for my babies, like they’ve gotten into college or found a job.

I’m also very interested in the time between which stories are written and when they are made available for consumption: it is usually so long for seemingly so little, but it’s a short time to hold your breath in the long run.  Anything is shorter that forever, which is also never. Here are some stories of mine I hope you guys will enjoy. 🙂

  1. Science Lessons (TAYO Literary Magazine)

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    Illustration by Diego Ibarra

    This is a series of three short stories all having to do with the scientific method of investigation. They were written during my chemistry classes which I both loved for their lack of structure (so many rules, so many exceptions, so many things to consider) and hated for their tediousness (so many rules, exceptions, things to consider). The story that’s available online is called Nomenclature (the study of naming things); in chemistry, we give names to things based on structure, how they are arranged, predisposed. In real life, it often seems to be the opposite: we behave according to our names, roles, circumstances.

  2. Sunning A Mattress (Southern Pacific Review)| 
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    Illustration by Liana Maris

    Around this time last year, I had friendship on the mind a lot. I’d gone to the beach twice that summer: once with old friends and again with people I didn’t know very well. I was thinking about the process of asking friends to come along, who was chosen, who wasn’t, who was allowed to drop in last minute, who wasn’t. I thought of preparing, of the guilt that follows telling someone where you have been, of tip-toeing around why they weren’t there. After this got published in the Southern Pacific Review, it was released as part of The Elementsa chapbook project I did with my friend Liana Maris which focused on friendship as a force of nature and how it is a living thing: changing as we age, evolving even as it is being defined.

  3. Jim, Adam, I (Alphabet Soup) 

    This series of five stories began as part of a project called The Experiment that I was part of in late 2014; I collaborated with Arabella Paner (collage artist) and Stephanie Gonzaga (poet) and we put out a chapbook every week where we created output based on a singular word or theme. We were interested in execution, in form, in fragments, in elongation and cutting. I thought scissors, halves, twos. Submitting to Alphabet Soup was spur-of-the-moment decision; I hadn’t thought of giving my twins out (you’ll understand when you read the stories haha) to anyone yet, but when Katie put up the call and talked about writing stories that were out there, that dealt with the anyhow, the anywhere, the anywhen, I figured why not.

 

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Events Fiction Poetry Workshops Writing

The Session Series: Creative Writing

I am so thrilled to have been invited by Magis Creative Spaces to be part of their Session Series! I’m going to be teaching a Creative Writing class, which will consist of 5 sessions. In it, we’ll be learning about the basics of creative writing (mostly fiction, and poetry) through reading stories, poems, and novels, as well as refining and developing our writing skills via writing exercises, and in-class critique. One thing that I have really wanted to do since I have begun getting opportunities like this was to reach out to a younger audience; I feel like I’m always thinking back to when I was younger, and how happy I would have been if there was a class available geared specifically toward fiction, and poetry. So this class is going to be for all of ye racy adolescents, (roughly) aged 13 to 17. I’m super psyched to be having fun craftversations, and to be immersing myself in the things other people have to say. Sign up is currently ongoing, and ya’ll can check the poster below to find out how to get in touch. 11825904_825012184281098_7258569828961938999_n

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Fiction Wonder Stories Writing

TFBS Take 2: Keep It Upstairs

Song referenced here.

We had the second run of TFBS sesh 1 last Saturday, meaning all of the creative writing portions of the workshop have been completed, and now it’s all about writing, refining, and revising our work. I am at once relieved, and also kind of sad at how quickly things have gone by.

Last Saturday was, in a way, in direct contrast with the first run of TFBS. The weather (surprisingly) cooperated, with the rain letting up about an hour before we started, and then again, around 30 minutes after we ended. I was prepared for the worst: cancellations, power outages, flooding, traffic jams, and encountered none of those things.I was there early, got to set up at my own pace. Everyone arrived (+/-) on time, and everybody had their game face on.

Perhaps the most interesting part of last Saturday (aside from the obvious writing, and for the nth time, surrounding myself with Lydia Davis’s beautiful work) was the mix of people who attended. There was so much diversity among the participants, I found myself amazed once again at what a medium for empathy, and friendship fiction can be–and likewise, what a medium for fiction people coming together can become. I really appreciated how engaged everyone was, and how willing to push themselves beyond their comfort zones (it is no easy feat to stay still for an hour and a half, writing). I could see that everyone was both discovering themselves, as well as beginning to separate themselves from their stories, as if to say: I made this, but this is not me. Being as cooped up, and reclusive as I can be, I always find it extremely exciting finding out what other people want to write about. What makes them tick? Last Saturday, we were taken to all sorts of different worlds: thrown into an online affair made physical, pushed through a mysterious door in the ceiling, suddenly sent hurtling toward an alternate reality where a Sandwich superhero exists to battle evil soda, put in the shoes of a hit-and-run witness, stuck in the head of someone who has been left behind.

Now I am excited to begin doing the dirty work: going through drafts, and reading deeply, and trying to get to the heart of the clock that is a story. What does it take to make it tick? One way to find out.

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Projects Published Stories Wonder Stories

Science Lessons in TAYO Literary Magazine’s 5th Anniversary Issue

Nomenclature Illustration by Diego Ibarra
Illustration by Diego Ibarra

I am very happy to announce that a series of my small stories are available in TAYO Literary Mag’s 5th Anniversary Issue! This has been a long time coming, and it so great to finally see these babies find a home. The physical copies of the issue are now available at Barnes & Noble; I think they might be available locally a little later in the year.

The series is called Science Lessons, and comprises of three stories which talk about the pains of learning through different sciences that we take up as we grow as people. I won’t talk about it so much, as to not take away from your reading. The stories were illustrated by Diego Ibarra, Trizha Ko, and Erika Carreon. Click here for an excerpt!

Categories
literature Projects Published Stories short stories

The Weatherman in Driftwood’s Latest Issue

I am very, very happy to announce that my somewhat morbid obsession with fairy tales has finally paid off. My story The Weatherman–published here in the poetry section, funnily enough, along with an interview about my writing is up and live! I worked very hard on this piece, and am particularly proud of how the narrative rounds itself out, or funnels like an hourglass.

You can click the beautiful photo below to read the issue on PDF (cover by Iryna Lialko & Sabrina Coyle), or you can head over to their website to buy the print copy. 🙂 I hope you guys enjoy this!
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